How Does A Solar Inverter Work? - powerearth.net

How Does A Solar Inverter Work?


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To understand how a solar inverter works, you need to understand the basic mechanics of how the power company sends out electricity. This article will tell you How Does A Solar Inverter Work? Solar panel collectors create electricity by creating an electrostatic attraction between an electrical charge that exists between two adjacent cells.

These electrostatic charges produced by high energy electrons being bumped into the cell walls by the solar panels. The electrons have an extra “charge” attached to them that produces a force of attraction on the electrons. This is an electric field, which creates a voltage across the solar cell. The problem is, these electrons get through the solar cell. They need to travel a distance from the top of the cell to the bottom of the cell.

The Design Of A Solar Inverter

How Does A Solar Inverter Work?
How Does A Solar Inverter Work?

Since there is no parallel path, the amount of distance the electrons travel is very small. So, the electrons will spend a lot of time in a horizontal position (on the surface of the solar cell). How long the electrons stay horizontal depends on the amount of charge in the cell.

If the charge is more than the electrons can handle, the electrons will jump across the surface of the cell. Then lose their momentum so they fall back down into the cell. This is why the electric field exists around the solar cell.

However, if the charge is less than the electrons can handle. The electrons jump across the surface of the cell and remain horizontal for a shorter period of time. Losing their momentum so they fall back down into the cell. This is why the electrical field exists around the solar cell.

How Does A Solar Inverter Work?

Since there is an electrical field surrounding the solar panel, it is attracting and holding the electrons. If you plug the solar inverter into a standard electrical outlet, the solar inverter will charge. The charge created by the solar panel was being delivered to the panel.

The inverter would then be using this charge to turn on the alternator and transfer. The electricity from the inverter to the conventional electrical outlet. So, how does the power company do this?

The DC circuit breaker that regulates the power flow between the inverter and the electric outlet. That needs to be a proper connection to the inverter. This is by connecting the inverter power cable into the power outlet and the inverter connection cable into the DC circuit breaker. When the inverter circuit breaker senses that there is no more charge that generated, it then turns off the outlet circuit.

If the power company sends a request to turn the DC circuit breaker back on. It requires to have a DC power cord that will extend out from the power outlet on the transformer. Then, the inverter has to calibrate to accept the new voltages. Once this is accomplished, the inverter can be sent the power from the power company.

How To Handle A Solar Inverter

How Does A Solar Inverter Work?
How Does A Solar Inverter Work?

This process can be repeated whenever the solar panel is switched on. The solar panel power cord can be plugged into the inverter once the inverter is turned on and the inverter can then be plugged into the power outlet on the transformer. Once the inverter receives power from the power company, it will immediately switch on the generator and begin powering the home or business.

So, you see, the use of a solar panel is a great way to not only power your home but the whole community. For less than half the cost of a regular monthly utility bill, you can generate and store the equivalent of hundreds of watts of electricity. That’s enough to power your lights, computer, DVD player, TV, appliances, and electronics all for one low monthly fee.

With a solar inverter installed in your home, you will never have to worry about your power company again. If you’re interested in installing your own solar panels, I’d recommend downloading my free guide – Installing a Solar Panel!

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